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When we first moved into our home a year and a half ago, it was tan.  Like, completely tan y’all.  And, i’m not talking about light, airy tan.  I’m talking about muddy tan.
When we were looking for a home to buy, I fell in love with it immediately.  It was designed really well, and was very cohesive. The only catch was, it wasn’t light and bright…and that’s what i wanted.  If you’ve been following along on my blog, or Instagram, then you already know that i have made some big changes to make this place my own.  Like completely redoing my kitchen from dark to white (the post is coming) and adding shiplap to my entire entry way and hallway…you can find that post HERE.
But, this post is about the day i decided to change our downstairs family room to a brighter area and add a beautiful Industrial Farmhouse Shelving Unit to the wall to house our TV… and some of my favorite farmhouse finds.  And today, I’m going to show you all how to do it!
This was the wall before…dark, no character, with a tv propped on an old desk i thrifted and refinished for my kids playroom loft from our last home.
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Ive pulled the unit away from the wall here because painting this room in a lighter color was the first thing that needed to happen…my littles watched Ice Age while i worked!
Here’s how it looked after i finished painting it:
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Already so much brighter!  Paint can do wonders!
Next, we planned out the shelving unit..the size of the unit for this tutorial is 8’8″ wide by 7’6″ tall by 11.25″ deep, but you could make adjustments to make your unit fit whatever wall you are building it for.
Here’s a pic of how it looked when we installed it:
I apologize for the awful lighting and shadows in this pic y’all!
HERE IS YOUR SUPPLY LIST: 
 (1/2″  plumbing pipes and fittings were used for the entire unit)
Pipe:
6 : 12″ pipes
7:  18″ pipes
1:  32″ pipe
3:  30″ pipes (Home Depot will cut this length for you)
1:  43″ pipe  (Home Depot to cut this length)
14:  8″ pipes
4:  9″ pipes (this is the black gas pipe for the top flange connectors) *If you have any questions on any of these, your local home improvement store will know exactly what these all are…I suggest taking this list with you when you go!
Fittings:
18:  90 degree elbows
14:  3-way Tees
8:  Base Flanges
Wood (shelves):
2:  1″x12″x10′ pine boards (cut down to 8’8″)
2:  1″x12″x6′ pine boards (cut to 4’8″)
Paint: 
MMS (Miss mustard seeds) milk paint (color: Grainsack) (or whatever paint or stain you want your shelves to be)
MMS Clear wax and Antiquing dark wax

Rustoleum Gloss Protective Enamel (Black)

Tools:
Hand sander or sanding block
3/4″ drill bit (to drill the holes for the pipes to fit through)
Dish soap (to clean pipes before installing)
Drill
Stud finder
Unit Size:
It ends up being 8’8″ wide and about 7’6″ tall and about 11.25″ deep
Cost: 
About $250
Here’s cute Mr. B at Home Depot as we gathered supplies:
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Once you get your pipes and fittings home, You need to remove the price stickers, and wash them well in a sink of hot soapy water because they are traditionally used for plumbing and are greasy.
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Here is a pic of our growing pile of washed pipes:
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Once dry, i chose to spray paint the pipes black to give them a nice coat,  (also because some of our fittings and flanges were silver).  This is how they look before you spray them:
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While spraying:
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See how the spray gives them a much more finished look?
While those were drying, I started sanding my pine boards to smooth out any rough spots and prepare them for my paint and finish.
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Once the boards were all sanded, i wiped them down and started painting them.  I wanted a really light grey finish that looked like old weatherd wood, so i chose to use MMS Milk Paint in Grainsack.
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I painted the wood with the milk paint, and then mixed clear wax with dark distressing wax and worked that into the wood.  You can see the difference the wax makes in this pic:
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I love how it really brings out the character of the wood and gives that distressed look, but adds a velvety soft finish at the same time.
Once everything is dry, lay out your pieces on the floor and start assembling your unit.  We made sure to to use a stud finder to secure the center rod to a stud on our wall.  As you start putting it together, use your 3/4″ round drill bit to make your holes in the shelves so they can slide onto the pipes.  Its best to have two people when securing your unit to the wall.  It goes up really quickly, and in no time, you’ll have a beautiful industrial shelving unit for a fraction of the cost you would pay to buy it!
Here are some pics of the shelves styled:
Industrial Farmhouse Shelving Unit
Industrial Farmhouse Shelving Unit

When styling my shelves, I always like to “shop my house” for things that I treasure…Things that i have picked up along the way that have a story and inspire me.  I like to use lots of layers and create different heights using books or unexpected pairings, like an antique pully nestled in an ironstone bowl.  I love adding fresh flowers, and hydrangeas happen to be a favorite of mine!  I love the cluster of the peddles and their lovely scent.  I don’t think you can ever go wrong with styling with flowers that inspire you.  I like to take advantage of negative space and still create something interesting for the eye.  Here, i used an empty antique oval frame that i painted the same color as the walls and distressed just a tiny bit.

 

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Using different shapes and elements helps to draw the eye to the many treasures displayed on the shelves. I’ve used triangles, rectangles, circles, ovals, and even free shape pieces like the old piece of driftwood and the antique horse bookends.  And while we are on the subject of book ends…i love using old books in decor.  I love to read and write, and something about books that have been loved through the ages just makes me feel peaceful.

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I hope y’all have enjoyed this tutorial and that you have found it helpful!! I know this post is long, but this is truly a DIY you can do pretty easily and much more inexpensively than purchasing a unit from a home decor store!
I’d love to hear your thoughts and comments! Is this something you think you might do?  I would love to hear about it!!
Much Love,
Heather

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